9 Followers
18 Following
willemite

willemite

Currently reading

Hieroglyph: Stories and Blueprints for a Better Future
Neal Stephenson
Ukraine: Zbig's Grand Chessboard & How the West Was Checkmated
Natylie Baldwin, Kermit D. Larson
The Girl on the Train: A Novel
Paula Hawkins
Our Souls at Night: A novel
Kent Haruf
Above the Waterfall
Ron Rash
On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
Stephen King
Designs on Film: A Century of Hollywood Art Direction
Cathy Whitlock
The Homicide Report: Understanding Murder in America
Jill Leovy
Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
Erik Larson
The Gods of Mars
Edgar Rice Burroughs
Marley and Me: Life and Love With the World's Worst Dog - John Grogan Marley is a lovable lab and the structural element around which Grogan writes his own coming of age story. Grogan and wife are reporters in south Florida, and take on the responsibility of a pooch as a way for his wife to see if she is up to the challenge of handling a baby. We follow Grogan as he tries to gain some control over the rambunctious Marley. He leads us through the life of a young couple as they try and fail to have a child, then try and try again, successfully. He shows us the changes in his neck of Florida, and the changes in Marley and his wife. We meet his babies and see how Marley attaches to them. It is a charming tale, warmly told, of a flawed but lovable pooch. It is no shock that this tale bolted its way to the top of the bestsellers’ list and would not let go. Eventually the family moves to Pennsylvania as Grogan takes over publishing duties for the Rodale Press. The Pennsylvania portion is definitely the lesser part here. Marley learns about snow and gets a taste of the Middle Atlantic, but all too soon he begins to go gray and soon after he begins a rapid medical decline. The final chapters address his demise. I was relating particularly to the passing of Bo while reading this, choking up the whole time. Grogan tacks on his take on what Marley taught his human masters. It was a bit maudlin, but what the heck. This is a very engaging and enjoyable read. Payload, such as it is, concerns dogs in general and labs in particular. But the joy here is the pure, untrammeled love of Marley for life and his loyalty to his family. Recommended. Carry tissues.